Why Boys Might Be Weathering the Pandemic Better Than Girls

Videogame-playing has soared during the Covid-19 pandemic, fueled largely by boys who socialize while they play—but how much is too much?

As many parents know, turning off a child's gaming console in the middle of gameplay is a surefire way to trigger a tantrum. WSJ Family & Tech columnist Julie Jargon explains why.

During the first month of the coronavirus shutdown, 9-year-old Drew Schnurman read books, played board games and watched YouTube. But he got bored a lot.

“He was really needy, asking me to play with him all the time and looking for a lot of attention,” said his mother, Dana Schnurman, a public-relations freelancer who was trying to keep him occupied while working from her Deerfield, Ill., home.

Some of his school friends messaged him on his iPad, asking him to play “Fortnite,” the popular online game. And some of the mothers asked Ms. Schnurman if he’d like to join the other boys. Ms. Schnurman suggested it to Drew. He wasn’t interested. Desperate to connect her son with friends and to take some of the entertainment burden off of herself, she persisted. He finally agreed to give it a try.

香蕉视频苹果下载Now, he spends almost all day and night in the basement playing “Fortnite,” and his parents are having a hard time prying him away.

Videogame-playing has soared during the pandemic, with the major game developers reporting record sales. During a one-week period in March, after the coronavirus was declared a pandemic, U.S. videogame usage on Verizon networks increased by 75%, according to the telecom.

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